Variety Review of “The Parting Glass” directed by Stephen Moyer

Below is part of the Variety review of the Parting Glass and it sure is a positive one AND it resonates with me. I can’t wait to see the film which they describe as a modest but rather lovely directorial debut for Stephen Moyer.  We simply cannot wait to see the film and are thrilled for Stephen, the cast and all involved from CASM films.

Variety review
credit: Denis O’Hare Appreciation Group on Facebook

As most Stephen Moyer fans know, the film is a fine ensemble, including Melissa Leo and Cynthia Nixon, play all the right notes in Stephen Moyer and Denis O’Hare’s delicate family drama.

Directed by Stephen Moyer With: Denis O’Hara, Cynthia Nixon, Melissa Leo, Rhys Ifans, Ed Asner, Anna Paquin
1 hour 35 minutes

Read part of Variety’s review below:

Naming a film after a famous song can be mildly distracting: As much as we’re swept up in the action at hand, a small part of our brains keeps semi-patiently waiting for the tune to turn up. In “The Parting Glass,” Stephen Moyer’s modest but rather lovely directorial debut, you wait for the eponymous Irish folk song to kick in toward the end, as befits its gorgeous, farewell-themed lyrics, and so it does — used in pretty much the exact way one might have expected, but no less stirring and satisfying for that. That’s an outcome typical of this finely wrought, deeply felt family drama, in which a fractious Irish-American clan of adult siblings gathers to mourn their recently deceased kid sister: Written with great humor and humanity by actor Denis O’Hare — who also takes a key role in a classy ensemble that includes Melissa Leo, Cynthia Nixon, Anna Paquin, Ed Asner and Rhys Ifans — “The Parting Glass” breaks no new ground narratively or stylistically, but hits its emotional marks with rewarding precision.

Indeed, it’s the kind of film that unfolds with the warm, deliberate intimacy of a good play, which is not to call it stagey: “The Parting Glass” depends vividly on its various down-at-heel, frostbitten Missouri locations for its cumulative impact, as tempers fray in tune with their unsympathetic surrounds. O’Hare, himself a Kansas City son, has evidently written a degree of autobiography into his first feature screenplay, which revolves around a family structured similarly to his own; Englishman Moyer, O’Hare’s co-star on HBO’s “True Blood,” directs his words with attentive but unimposing restraint. With Paquin, Moyer’s wife, co-producer and fellow “True Blood” alum, also on board, “The Parting Glass” serves as something of a reunion for the defunct vampire show — an improbable extra selling point, though the film should find boutique distribution on its own gentle merits.

It’s hard being an outsider in this family,” complains Karl (Rhys Ifans), the doleful estranged husband of Colleen (Paquin), an unsettled, unhappy young woman who, as the film begins, has recently died in tragic, uncertain circumstances. He’s not wrong: Whether loving or fighting, Ally (Leo), Mare (Nixon) and Dan (O’Hare) have the kind of bond, tangled up in shared history and storytelling, that takes some time to understand. Sitting with them and their crotchety but feeling-riven father (Asner) as they alternately gab and grieve in airless cars, wipe-clean roadside diners and cheapjack motel rooms, “The Parting Glass” takes that time: The family is ostensibly headed to Colleen’s apartment to sort through her belongings, but the trip inevitably grows into a larger familial reckoning, swirling raucous memories with recounted mistakes.

Read the full review by going to Variety.com

 

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